an official New Hampshire government website
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
Air Quality Forecast
Monday, December 22, 2014

This page provides forecast information on New Hampshire's air quality. The information can be used to help you plan your daily activities and protect your health. You can also learn what the current air pollution levels are in your area by clicking on the Current Air Quality link.

Air Quality Forecast
The pollutant of concern for the period:  Fine Particles
County Saturday
December 20

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Sunday
December 21

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Monday
December 22

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Tuesday
December 23

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Belknap GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
Carroll GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
Cheshire GOOD MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE
Coos GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
Grafton GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
Hillsborough GOOD MODERATE MODERATE GOOD
Merrimack GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
Rockingham GOOD MODERATE MODERATE GOOD
Strafford GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
Sullivan GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
Region Saturday
December 20

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Sunday
December 21

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Monday
December 22

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Tuesday
December 23

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Seacoast* GOOD GOOD MODERATE GOOD
High Elevations** GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD
* coastal Rockingham county
** elevations above 3000 ft in Carroll, Coos and Grafton counties

Relative Pollutant Levels Chart Comparison
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Range for Ozone: 0 to 64 parts per billion.
Range for Fine Particles: 0 to 15 micrograms per cubic meter. Range for Ozone: 65 to 84 parts per billion.
Range for Fine Particles: 16 to 40 micrograms per cubic meter. Range for Ozone: 85 to 104 parts per billion.
Range for Fine Particles: 41 to 65 micrograms per cubic meter. Range for Ozone: 105 to 124 parts per billion.
Range for Paticles: 66 to 150 micrograms per cubic meter.

The air quality forecast for New Hampshire is also available on the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services' Air Quality Information Line at (800) 935-SMOG.

The forecast is made for two different air pollutants:  ground-level ozone and particle pollution.  The pollutant whose concentration is highest relative to federal standards is shown in the table above.  An Air Quality Action Day is issued when unhealthy levels are forecast for either pollutant.

Ground-level ozone, more commonly called summertime smog, is formed when pollutants (nitrogen oxides and volative organic compounds) react chemically in the presence of sunlight.   Since ground-level ozone is a summertime pollutant, air quality forecasts for ozone are provided from April through September.

Fine Particle Pollution consists of both solid and liquid particles that are less than 2.5 microns in diameter (a micron is a millionth of a meter).  Exposure to particle pollution is associated with numerous serious health effects.  Air quality forecasts for particle pollution are provided year-round.


Air Quality Guide for Ozone and Particle Pollution

Air Quality Descriptor

Populations Affected & Recommended Actions

Ozone

Particle Pollution
(fine particles)

GOOD

No health impacts expected in this range.

No health impacts expected in this range.

MODERATE

Unusually sensitive people* should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion. Unusually sensitive people* should consider limiting prolonged exertion.

UNHEALTHY FOR SENSITIVE GROUPS

Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion. 

People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion.
UNHEALTHY Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion. People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion.  Everyone else should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion.

VERY UNHEALTHY

 Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid all outdoor exertion. Everyone else, especially children, should limit outdoor exertion.

People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should avoid all physical activity outdoors.  Everyone else should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion.
HAZARDOUS Everyone should avoid all outdoor exertion. Everyone should avoid all physical activity outdoors; people with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly and children should remain indoors and keep activity levels low.

* Unusually sensitive refers to individual people who are highly vulnerable to the effects of air pollution.

Related Topics


NH Department of Environmental Services | 29 Hazen Drive | PO Box 95 | Concord, NH 03302-0095
(603) 271-3503 | TDD Access: Relay NH 1-800-735-2964 | Hours: M-F, 8am-4pm
copyright 2008. State of New Hampshire